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Thread: What motivates you?

  1. #16
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    I think the locate rodeo is a wonderfull event. I believe that I could actually put this down as a motivational tool. Not to say that all companies will use it as such but my hat is off to all those who work hard to put on the event each and every year.

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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by noOT4me View Post
    I think the locate rodeo is a wonderfull event. I believe that I could actually put this down as a motivational tool. Not to say that all companies will use it as such but my hat is off to all those who work hard to put on the event each and every year.
    I would have to agree. I've always seen it as a type of reward...as the company's way of saying, "Joe is a great locator and has worked very hard to get there. He should be the one to represent our organization". It should be viewed as a complement to the level of success that you have achieved.

    If you ever get the time, you should read "Winning" by Jack Welch. For those of you that don't know, he is the acclaimed former CEO of General Electric. One idea that he promoted was that of Differentiality. In essence, it is the idea of treating people differently based on their level of performance. It's a fine line, though. I believe it to be easy to fall into the trap of showing favoratism. However, done properly, it can also be a great motivator.

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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Yep, I should know better by now.

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    Senior Member Wingfoot's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by yahoo View Post
    money is good too!
    Money & Fear.

    Even though I've had no raise in over a year, all my bone-us money and week-end incentives taken away (replaced by damage-free incentives), the fear of standing in Obama's soup line is all the motivation I need.



    ----------------------------------------------------------

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    Wink Re: What motivates you?

    O.K., Let me explain why I feel that the Locate Rodeo is a bad idea from a locator perspective. Just my observation and opinion. You don't have to accept it as "truth".
    Our type of work requires teamwork to thrive. Do you agree? Putting systems of prizes and competition in the workplace may have worked in the past in most sales related environments (Who ever sells the most cars gets a prize). In our industry however, I feel that it is an outdated tactic and may create bitterness because we have business partners with different ages, genders, and cultures and they respond differently to various styles of competition. Not everyone will feel as good as the two or three in this post. Since we are a team of men and women trying to achieve the same goals as business partners (employees), why put us to compete or challenge each other while management competes behind our backs by low balling and bidding wars you are not involved in as a business partner? Doesn't make any sense. They don't let you in on the decision making but they organize events to see you fight each other for a small check. Locator against locator? For the entertainment of a few? To promote products that you will not profit from? Some people despise and fear competition, and some managers misuse it.This old-school approach to competition might fit a war zone and certain do-or-die sports philosophies, but it doesn’t fit in today’s diverse workplace with many personality styles and cultural differences. In fact, this style of competition can terrorize employees and cost the company in turnover and lost productivity.You kill morale in my opinion because cooperation should be valued over competition. Remember that teams are far more powerful than individuals. Again, I do things differently now. If you came into our place looking to help us grow and be compensated, I would treat you like a business partner. I would tell you what we do, where we stand and show you how much money we make, what we use it on and where it goes. I would show you where we would like to be and ask you for ideas for us to grow valuable in the market place. I share profits with you. With that great trust on you from the door, you will iether leave and say "I'm not the one for you" or you will be loyal to us and participate in our growing our pockets.You can use our tools, vehicles and "stuff" to help us. You are in fact be part of our business. Of course you will have one or two bad apples once in a blue moon. But most of my men and women love owning their work. I am willing to bet that most firms have you fill out "no competition" forms telling you that you are not to compete directly or indirectly and if you came up with a good idea during working hours, they own the rights to it and by signing this paper you waive your rights to good Ideas. Right there you cut the main artery of creative thinking into your organization. Most people sign the papers just to start getting a paycheck because they have no choice, but you just hired enemies. You set the stage in the hiring process weather you all grow as a team or every man for him self and the hell with everybody else. Just milk em for as long as possible cause I have no say in the matter. They throw a thick employee handbook at you and have you sign the last page. You are sitting around a table with 20 other fine men and women you never met looking at each other thinking "What the hell is this, I'm not reading this shit, I'm being treated like a prisoner or new recruit at a military base" You insult good motivated men and women by throwing down thick employee handbooks and a bunch of rules they will never read on the first day of orientation. Well, that's all I have to say for now. I will save some for later

  6. #21
    Mke
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    First off, I'm not a big fan of the Locate Rodeos, but not because they are "competitive". (i'll get to the reason further down the post). We have a naturally occuring competitiveness built in. Men more then Women, but women have it none the less. Attempting to strip us of our competitive nature will only bring out an emotionless work environment. When everyone's work is just as acceptable as mine is, what makes me strive to "do more"? For the Good of the company? A company that shares the behind the scenes books to make the employee feel comfortable about the buisness decisions being made? I think you are glossing over the strife that company will inevitably run into. If you have open books, and no competitive nature what will your reasons be for the inequality in pay? Senority? The area that you locate in? When I come to you as a "buisness partner" and ask why Joe makes more then me, do you just tell me not to care because we are not competing in this work environment?

    Competitive nature of the Locating industry is the way we can seperate the "do'ers" from the "sleepers". If I bust my ass and do a better job then Joe, I need to be paid better then Joe. I do a good job for several Years, reward me with an Easier area. Don't try and homoginize the locating industry with these bland references to a utopian society that everyone is happy with. Work Sucks... thats why we get paid to do it. If it was something we enjoyed doing...... we'd do it for free. And as long as money is involved so is competition.

    As for Non-compete forms, handbooks and overall red tape....... that just ads to sucky work environment.... deal with it. No matter what job you do, no matter where you go, there will always be someone you don't want to work with/for. There will always be things you have to do that you don't think is neccesary.

    As for the Locate Rodeo, I think its a great Idea, but it hasn't came to its pinnacle yet. It should be a floating exposition instead of hunkering down in the south. It would be nice for it to bounce from Georgia to New England to Southern Cal to Pacific Northwest to Mid-West. That way it will spread the gospel of Damage prevention, as well as include locators that my not other wise be able to go. Some of the best locators I know are usually too busy in the sumer time to take anytime off. Then it comes down to the way the fields are scored, deductions for falling hard hat? Most Locators have no need for a hard hat unless in an active Construction site. When I was a contract locator doing publics.......I might of worn a hard hat once, since then I wear it a bit more. Measuring off of the locates? I think that an impartial judge should do this at the end of every locate, this shouldn't be put on the locator. I don't have an issue with using tapes and such, but I know of a couple of locators one I might work with that may or may not be able to accurately read a tape or understand what to measure from.

    Keep it simple, Locate the utilities, hook ups, labeling, and time. Those should be the four judged (IMHO).

    just some rambling thoughts early in the morning.
    mke

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    Senior Member Wingfoot's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Locating Future View Post
    Most of my men and women love owning their work. I am willing to bet that most firms have you fill out "no competition" forms telling you that you are not to compete directly or indirectly and if you came up with a good idea during working hours, they own the rights to it and by signing this paper you waive your rights to good Ideas. Right there you cut the main artery of creative thinking into your organization. Most people sign the [No Compete] papers just to start getting a paycheck because they have no choice, but you just hired enemies. You set the stage in the hiring process whether you grow as a team or every man for him self. The hell with everybody else. Just milk em for as long as possible.
    Hey Man - Welcome to theVine. This is a powerful post! You kinda, sorta sound like a fella we 'Viners know. And if you are, all the shit and trouble that has been stirred just wears me out. I put myself on guard on every Noob that overcomes his/her shyness to make their first post. It kinda, sorta takes the fun away for me. I feel it's not fair to the Noob or me. But this is something that I have learned to adjust too. As for me, I don't care who you are if you continue to make civil posts, as you have demonstrated above, that requires a lot of thought for you to manifest and for me as a reader to digest.

    With that being said, I enjoyed reading your post and I agree with everything you've said. In my previous jobs as a salesperson working for big international corporations, I have signed "NO Compete" contracts to get my first paycheck. It didn't mean shit to me when I signed the contract, but I later found out just how much it affected me. I am not aware of this tactic in the utility locating field, but I can see it being used.

    --------------------------------------------------

  8. #23
    Conservative Meanie ifinditunderground's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    It is more widely practiced in the SUE side of things Wing. (Non-Compete Clauses)
    There is a fine line between "Hobby" and "Mental Illness."
    "America isn't free, in America you are free to follow the rules." -Anthony Cumia


  9. #24
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO View Post
    I just read an interesting article on motivation that got me thinking. [I]Here's the link if you are interested...

    [COLOR="Blue"[/COLOR]

    With Christmas and year end quickly approaching, I'm curious to get your take on incentive programs. I know that this has been discussed on the forum before, but perhaps we can ask the question another way.

    We all know that money is tight right now, both for us and the companies for which we work. Additionally, we have all seen bonus programs come and go. But what other forms of incentive are out there? The article suggests non-monetary rewards. In fact, where I work, one-on-one meetings with senior leadership are a common reward for a job well done...as is being assigned to lead new projects. But focusing in on the role of a locator, what motivates you??? Is it strictly $$$ related? Or, is a GENUINE pat on the back meaningful enough? Or, maybe being assigned to sit on a task force to discuss root causes of damages???
    I can write at length, just read some of my other posts, on pay and other incentives and I will later.

    The purpose of such programs is to by influence shape the overall work attitude of the employees. To instill a sense of self purpose and of what is overall good for the firm is also good for them.

    Consider that whenever possible that a locators name be written, from company shirts to bulletin board postings, that the name be in black ink. Make all other names in red ink.

    In the old accounting ledgers red ink was used to denote an expense and black ink was used to denote income.

    There is only one employee in the entire firm that generates income, the locator. The CEO, General Manager, any VP or foreman does nothing that generates income. They may help successfully win a new contract with a client but not single penny comes in until the locator puts down paint. Marking underground utilities is the only thing that generates income.

    For the non-locators in the firm the best they can do is minimize the expense they represent. The most effective way to do this is to support the locators. See that they are well trained, get properly supplied and that the support systems are optimized to support field personnel.

    Equally field personnel must understand that they are responsible for not only the security of their own job but that of every other class of employee.

    The idea is to instill in all people the focus of making money and what is needed to do that. Too often bad attitudes exist both in the locators and other nonproductive employees.

    There is a problem common in business, that the support teams place too great an importance on their function and not support of the money end in favor of their department. This is because in almost every firm, not just locating firms, the support departments usually end up being the ones that make up the budgets. Money goes to support that should be going to making more money. While these positions are always a management one they fail to see the concept that in business the dog is the producing employee and the tail is the support management. The tail does not wag the dog and in business the dog is the part that generates income.

    An example I can give is discussing with the software people what we as locators needed the software to do. The answer I got was that they were computer programmers and only they would tell us what we needed. They had forgotten that they were IT Support and their job was to meet the needs of the computer users.

    I was doing quality audits and I found one lcoator's makes off. I was able to duplicate their error and found they were walking too fast and swinging the receiver in an incorrect arc. I advised their foreman and was told to go instruct the locator how to do locating. That foreman did not understand that the growth and development of a locator was his job, not just doing paperwork. (I would have helped out the locator but my in-box was overflowing, no way to help them)

    There are employees, from locaotrs to CEOs, that something like this will positively influence to do better work. There of course the employees that will never have the right attitude. Still positive influences should be instigated to reach those that are receptive to it.

    And that was one of my short posts.

  10. #25
    Senior Member beyond help's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Oh Hell, there goes the neighborhood.
    STRESS: The confusion created when one's mind overrides the body's basic desire to choke the living daylights out of some idiot who desperately deserves it.

  11. #26
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO View Post
    I just read an interesting article on motivation that got me thinking. [I]Here's the link if you are interested...

    http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Motivating_people_Getting_beyond_money_2460

    With Christmas and year end quickly approaching, I'm curious to get your take on incentive programs. I know that this has been discussed on the forum before, but perhaps we can ask the question another way.

    We all know that money is tight right now, both for us and the companies for which we work. Additionally, we have all seen bonus programs come and go. But what other forms of incentive are out there? The article suggests non-monetary rewards. In fact, where I work, one-on-one meetings with senior leadership are a common reward for a job well done...as is being assigned to lead new projects. But focusing in on the role of a locator, what motivates you??? Is it strictly $$$ related? Or, is a GENUINE pat on the back meaningful enough? Or, maybe being assigned to sit on a task force to discuss root causes of damages???
    This artical appeared today and reminded me of your posting. It covers in part what you quiried.

    IT notes that 60% off employes polled said they planed on leaving their present employer once the economy got better.

    http://smallbusiness.aol.com/article...08193509990001

    5 Tips for Retaining Key Employees
    By MARK HENRICKS, AOL SMALL BUSINESS
    Posted: 2010-02-08 20:19:21

    Small business owners pining for full-fledged recovery may want to temper their enthusiasm for each and every positive economic report. The Wall Street Journal, citing a survey by human resources consulting firm Right Management, warns that 60% of workers plan to quit their jobs and look for better ones when the employment situation improves. That could mean that just when rising demand finally enables business owners to operate closer to capacity, they'll find themselves short of the workers they need to satisfy customers.

    It doesn't have to be that way, however. Small businesses that hang on to their key employees -- while taking advantage of opportunities to hire stars departing from their competitors -- can turn the upcoming turmoil to their advantage. Here are five steps you can take now to keep from losing your best workers:

    1) Start by identifying your most important human assets. Essentially, you need to at least somewhat formally assess the skills and talents of your current workforce. Then see how they match up against your business objectives and process requirements. Don't be surprised or threatened if you find some gaps -- every business has some and, once you know where they are, you're better positioned to fill them with your competitors' ex-workers. Talent assessment is also critical for accurately pinpointing the employees who are truly key to your operation. Again, you may find that some people you thought were invaluable are actually easily replaced by someone else on your team. And you may learn that you've been overlooking a few who were your real stars.

    2) Don't just pull out your checkbook. While almost any employee welcomes a raise, the reasons for the recent record lows in job satisfaction have more to do with not feeling appreciated, doing work that matters, or having the tools they need to perform tasks than with just wanting more money. You may wind up having to pay more to keep your best, but you can try other changes first.

    3) Make them feel appreciated. There are lots of low-cost moves you can make to boost feelings of appreciation. How about reinstating the company-paid morning doughnuts you used to offer before cost-cutting ended the practice? Little things can go a long way when it comes to letting employees know you value their efforts.

    3) Communicate, communicate, communicate. Talk to employees, using everything from casual conversations at the water cooler to company-wide email newsletters. Emphasize how their work fits into the company's overall objectives and performance. Alert them to wins and losses and tell them in advance of upcoming decisions. Then, listen when they talk back.

    4) Make their jobs doable, if not easy. Productivity always rises during recession, because people get laid off and those who are left have to do more work. But that inevitably leads to some level of workforce stress, burnout and turnover. So be alert to signs of frustration such as escalating intra-office conflicts, absenteeism and missed deadlines. If necessary, assign more people to daunting functions and projects. And whether it's training, equipment, space or even temporary help, give them the essential tools to get their work done right and on time.

    5) Finally, don't burn bridges. If an employee leaves, that doesn't have to mean you're completely in the lurch. If you handle a star's resignation with kid gloves, you may be able to tap the employee's knowledge base even after employment has ended. Ask whether the new person filling the job could call up with any questions for a month or so -- sort of an informal consulting/mentor relationship. If there are no hard feelings, many conscientious employees will agree to do that. And there's always the chance the new job won't work out and one or more of your high performers will be back, to once again exert their considerable talents for you, rather than against you.

  12. #27
    Senior Member ProfessionalLocator's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    On my previous post I am partially in disagreement with recommendation #2.

    2) Don't just pull out your checkbook. While almost any employee welcomes a raise, the reasons for the recent record lows in job satisfaction have more to do with not feeling appreciated, doing work that matters, or having the tools they need to perform tasks than with just wanting more money. You may wind up having to pay more to keep your best, but you can try other changes first.
    . . . .. .. . .. . . .. . . .. . . . .. ... . . . . ..

    In a firm where there have been cuts in pay and benefits not giving something here can have a negative effect. Even if it is just a small amount do so to show there is more coming. This will backfire on you if in the future when the economy is better and the company making more money and the employees do not get raises they feel cheated out of their share.

    I know one employee at an office of over 100 locators. He was in the top 5% of employees in productivity and low damage rate. A person in corporate looked at the bonus program and saw that only the top people were earning a bonus. This genius decided that since the bad employees who had low productivity, high absenteeism, late for work and higher damages they must not be motivated by the bonus program. So the bonus program was completely removed. Along with other pay and benefit cuts the top locators lost between 10% to 20% of their income. This was years BEFORE the recession hit.

    If nothing else see to it your top people, the ones who make the most profit for you, get something extra in the paycheck.

    What is more the pay scale was restructured so those lower locators got a pay raise.

    Many of the old locators are gone now and the ones that remain do so for various reasons. The most common I hear is they have now built up to tow,three weeks of vacation and do not want to start over.

  13. #28
    Senior Member yahoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    i don't really know anymore WHAT motivates me????? that is the point i'm at in my life! the little i'm riding on now is the Saints winning the superbowl!!!!
    wise men talk because they have something to say and fools because they have to say something....plato

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    Default Re: What motivates you?

    Quote Originally Posted by yahoo View Post
    i don't really know anymore WHAT motivates me????? that is the point i'm at in my life! the little i'm riding on now is the Saints winning the superbowl!!!!
    im with you idk anymore...
    "What Are You Doin!?!? GET THE HELL OFF MY LAWN!"
    you have entered a restricted area

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