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Thread: Ready to unionize

  1. #16
    Senior Member ProfessionalLocator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by superman View Post
    Same thing you would do now. Go to the company that picked up the new contract. With a National Locators Union, all companies and locators would be involved. Just like Retired talked about, it could be like the National Players Union. All the sports players are in the same union, but there are different owners/teams to play (work) for.
    The owners of these sports teams all belong to a league so that they can play against each other. This was the players union makes a main contract with the league, not the individual team owners. In addition players can negotiate additional terms with the individual teams.

    Being a member of a national locators union is of no direct advantage when applying to another firm that has not signed a contract or been directed by the NLRB to accept the locators union.

    Perhaps worse is that if you go to many of these locate firms and announce you are a union member they may decide not to hire you.

    The advantage may be that if such a union had requirements to meet to be more than just a base member. A entry level locator, journeyman, master, etc.

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    International Union of Operating Engineers is one union and there are many more. There is a way to put the trade, craft or what ever you want to call it nation wide, closed shop. You unionize the trade so anyone coming in would have to be a member and utilities and locate companies would have to recongize it and deal with it. you can do this state to state or national. National Association of Damage Prevention Specialist is a example of names that can be used. I have a close connection with a higher up in the IAM and will find out from him which way would be best for the industry to go as far as how to unionize.

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    What about right to work states 22 or 23 I think

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by retired View Post
    International Union of Operating Engineers is one union and there are many more. There is a way to put the trade, craft or what ever you want to call it nation wide, closed shop. You unionize the trade so anyone coming in would have to be a member and utilities and locate companies would have to recongize it and deal with it. you can do this state to state or national. National Association of Damage Prevention Specialist is a example of names that can be used. I have a close connection with a higher up in the IAM and will find out from him which way would be best for the industry to go as far as how to unionize.
    Eitheir way, whether your pro-union or anti-union, I think it's fair to say we are very under valued and under appreciated. We have human lives in our hands, and for what $15-$18 bucks an hour, WOW!! Is that really what were worth? If you take pride in locating and want to make a carreer out of it, then let's stand up and do something to better our profession!!!

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    Senior Member Turk182's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by orangeboots View Post
    What about right to work states 22 or 23 I think
    Those are actually right to pay you less states.
    superman likes this.

  6. #21
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by Turk182 View Post
    Those are actually right to pay you less states.
    I breaks down to this, the employer has the right to enter a binding contract and the employee does not. An employer may enter into a contract to make themselves the exclusive supplier of goods or services and the employee cannot.

    Federal law requires even in 'right to work' states for an employer to recognize a union that is formed under NLRB guidelines. The existence of a union does not infringe on anyone's 'right to work' as the union has to accept them as members if an employer that is contracted with a union hires them. There are some trade unions where hires must meet their journeyman or masters requirements before an employer can hire them to position rated for that.

    A nonunion worker in a right to work state gets paid the same wages and benefits as a union worker and if the employer does not said employee may file a grievance through the union which is required to represent the nonunion employee. The nonunion employee gets all the negotiated benefits of the union employee without paying union dues and without the right to strike. At least that is ow it was back in the 1980s'. These laws can vary by state.

    These laws were introduced across the nation by the National Right to Work Organization which is really a lobbying group for business. The root of this is National Right to Work Committee founded by business men in southern US in the 1950s'. The money to operate this effort is raised by National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation whose funding is largely by business. They present themselves as a grassroots effort by American workers while really being an effort of their employers. They use National Right to Work name like the Ministry of Love in Orwell's 1984, make themselves sound friendly to the people they are hostile too.

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    The Marlboro Man says:
    According to all the anti-union wise guy's, a union is not the answer. They think becoming a certified/licensed locator or something is the answer for all of our problems.
    Then He says this:
    Eitheir way, whether your pro-union or anti-union, I think it's fair to say we are very under valued and under appreciated. We have human lives in our hands, and for what $15-$18 bucks an hour, WOW!! Is that really what were worth? If you take pride in locating and want to make a carreer out of it, then let's stand up and do something to better our profession!!!
    Sounds sensible to me.
    "Change does not always equal progress."

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Meaning, lets get together and form some kind of locators union to better our profession. Sorry Steve if I didn't use the right words.

    I have no problem if your anti-union. Everyone has their own opinion. I am pro-union, but if your way works with the certification of locators, Hey, I'm all in. Eitheir way, it's clear that we must be on the same page with whatever we do, or we will all just be bickering all the time and nothing will get done.

  9. #24
    Mke
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    What are the Top three things in your current position that you feel the union can fix?

    Is it the Pay?
    Hours Worked?
    Benefits?

    what are the persisting issues that are causing the most upheavel in the industry?

    mke

  10. #25
    Senior Member Turk182's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by Mke View Post
    What are the Top three things in your current position that you feel the union can fix?

    Is it the Pay?
    Hours Worked?
    Benefits?

    what are the persisting issues that are causing the most upheavel in the industry?

    mke
    Stand by pay for being on call
    Minimum work weeks
    Balanced work force

  11. #26
    Senior Member ProfessionalLocator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by Turk182 View Post
    Stand by pay for being on call
    Minimum work weeks
    Balanced work force
    They usually do not negotiate stand by pay until they have won a lawsuit. Stand by pay is required by Federal government when being on-call / stand by significantly interferes with your ability to use your non-paid personal hours.

    The courts have ruled that you can be required not to drink alcohol during standby if work requires sobriety. If historically a person on standby gets called once a week, can resolve the problem by phone then they do not get standby pay. If the employer requires a response time that significantly interferes with personal hours they can be required to pay stand by which is why many firms allow the oncall people to keep their vehicles with them if they visit a friends place, shopping, etc.

    The unions strategy is not to put standby pay into an initial contract and concentrate on other things. In part becasue the employer will figure the cost of standby pay and then not give on another benefit that they would have agreed too. So the union does not introduce stand by pay as a contract issue. Once they have the contract they wait and file a complaint with the Feds ( I believe the Dept of Labor) and get the standby pay without having to give up anything at the bargaining table.

    If anybody introduces standby pay at the bargaining table it is the company trying to get a lower pay rate than would be awarded by the Feds. A poorly prepared union negotiator would also introduce standby pay at the bargaining table.

    Our office has an oncall rotation where you work oncall Monday, then next week Tuesday and so on until you get to Saturday where you also get Sunday. Your rotation may not occur again for a month or more depending on overall complement. This was not introduced to circumvent an effort to get standby pay although it does so very well. It was because locators working seven days straight were exhausted and often unable to work their regular day shifts disrupting work.

  12. #27
    Member KaineF's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    I work for a large locate company and I spend one week oncall and then get three weeks off oncall. A month of oncall is split between four guys. There is no standby pay. What you work when you get called out is what you get paid for. Thats it. Are you saying that it is Federally illegal to not pay me standby time for this?

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Week at a time for me and every other week. My on call area is absolutely huge. Couple weeks ago there was a 2.5 hr drive for 1 ticket. It's really frickin nice after working a 12 hour day to get a call that's 2 hours away. 2 hours there 2 hours back .5 hour to do the work. I just worked a 17 hour day. In the meantime, my wife works nights so my teenage daughter has to stay home and take care of my 4 year old boy. She rides the bus with him to make sure he gets home safe. Then she has to bathe him, feed him, and put him to bed. Then she has to find time to do her homework. Then I wonder why she is failing school. So then I finally get home about 1 am. 4 hours of sleep then get back up and start my next day. This type of shit has been ongoing since April. I am down now to only a couple tickets past due. I don't even put delays on tickets any more. For awhile there I was spending an hour every morning calling contractors to tell them their stuff isn't located. Frickin had it I tell ya.

  14. #29
    Senior Member ProfessionalLocator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by KaineF View Post
    I work for a large locate company and I spend one week oncall and then get three weeks off oncall. A month of oncall is split between four guys. There is no standby pay. What you work when you get called out is what you get paid for. Thats it. Are you saying that it is Federally illegal to not pay me standby time for this?
    In general terms yes, but specifically for your company maybe not.

    To meet federal standby pay requirements your oncall must interfere significantly with your ability to use your off duty hours. One factor will be historically how many hours you have to work. Another factor is response time required for you to arrive at job site and if it restricts you to staying close to home.

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    Default Re: Ready to unionize

    Quote Originally Posted by ProfessionalLocator View Post
    In general terms yes, but specifically for your company maybe not.

    To meet federal standby pay requirements your oncall must interfere significantly with your ability to use your off duty hours. One factor will be historically how many hours you have to work. Another factor is response time required for you to arrive at job site and if it restricts you to staying close to home.

    I am oncall 24/7/365...... so what you are saying is that I should.be getting payed for the time I have to sit around the house and not being able to do anything since I may get a call???

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