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Thread: Old Communication lines

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    Default Old Communication lines

    Thought i would start a thread out of curiosity of knowing what the oldest active phone cables anyones come across.
    Ive got an old NW Bell lead 600pr from 1908 running in a duct in one of my area's.

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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    Pulp cable from 1915 that runs solo feeds three businesses and doesn't run. Have to get on a pair at a cross box 4 blocks over.
    I got it hit 2 years ago and didn't go on record.
    Anyone know if there's any money digging up old phone lines for AT&T and recycling them?

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    Senior Member yahoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    none that old in my area
    wise men talk because they have something to say and fools because they have to say something....plato

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    Administrator TheCableVine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    I've seen them from the 20's. I think 29 is the oldest I've seen. This one was a lead sheathed 25 pair in a manhole that was brick lined.
    "Change does not always equal progress."

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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    Must be old bell territory. The town with the lead 600pr i work in is mostly brick lined manholes. They still use 2 1862pr lead cables from the mid 50's that come directly from the CO. This town has the most active lead cables that ive ever seen. It's only a approx 2500 population town. The lead cables apparently last forever just as long as there not disturbed. What get's me is that some of the cables are older then the manholes and duct packages.

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    Administrator TheCableVine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    You are right. The manhole lids say... I think... mountain west bell or something like that. I know they have "Bell" on them.
    "Change does not always equal progress."

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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    It's insane. People were still using horse and buggies to get around and Bell was burying cable. Hell they were using horses and shovels to bury the cable. and that's why Ma Bell is the worst to locate present day.. it's friggen OLD! It will never get replaced until they run out of good pairs or whoever the current owners of the old bell exchanges decide to go to fiber.
    Last edited by Locaatwhiz; June 27th, 2012 at 08:50 AM.

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    Senior Member Wingfoot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    Quote Originally Posted by Locaatwhiz View Post
    It's insane. People were still using horse and buggies to get around and Bell was burying cable. Hell they were using horses and shovels to bury the cable. and that's why Ma Bell is the worst to locate present day.. it's friggen OLD! It will never get replaced until they run out of good pairs or whoever the current owners of the old bell exchanges decide to go to fiber.
    Hey Buddy - Welcome to the'Vine! Here is an interesting read on this subject:

    DSL Technology

    Q. The parties have been asked to provide evidence concerning DSL technology. Can you briefly describe this technology?

    A. Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) is a relatively advanced method of transmitting information over ordinary (copper) telephone lines. Unlike traditional analog technology (which has been in use since the days of Alexander Graham Bell), DSL transmits voices and other information in a digital format. This technology has several important advantages.

    First, it provides a more efficient way of handling computer traffic, since digital information doesn’t need to be converted to analog and back to digital (the function performed by traditional analog modems).

    Second, it makes it possible to transmit data over a copper loop many times faster than can be achieved with the best analog modems. Data can typically be transmitted at speeds of up to 1.54 Mbps, which is 50 times faster than a typical 28,800 bps modem. Over short distances, such as 1,000 feet, DSL can deliver data at an even faster rate. Third, it makes it possible to combine voice and data traffic on a single line, or to carry multiple voice paths on a single pair of copper wires. Even without compression, a transmission path of 1.54 Mbps is capable of carrying 24 separate conversations. With compression, the potential capacity of a DSL line is even greater.

    Q. Are there limitations to the use of DSL?

    A. Although DSL works with existing copper loops, it works best over short distances, and it doesn’t work with loops that are longer than 18,000 feet. Also, it may be necessary to “condition” the loop (e.g. by removing load coils).

    Q. What effect does DSL have on the seven remaining accounts?

    A. In general, DSL will tend to extend the life of existing copper cable–particularly distribution cable, and cable which is located within 18,000 feet of the wire center. In many an American family, a car bought new is considered obsolete after three or four years, and the family is ready to trade it in for something better (or at least different). However, that does not mean that the car’s economic life has been exhausted, as proven by the fact that other people will be willing to pay a substantial sum to lease or purchase that same car. The full life of the car extends far beyond the initial ownership period.

    Similarly, even if traditional analog copper technology were to become obsolete over the next decade, there is no reason to assume the underlying cables themselves would no longer have any economic value. To the contrary, today’s DSL technology is powerful enough to extend the life of existing copper cable for many years into the future. At least from an economist’s perspective, depreciation should consider the full duration of an item’s economic value, including uses to which an item can be converted after the initial use.

    Today’s DSL technology is capable of providing businesses and residences with very fast data services in addition to traditional voice services. While the popularity of DSL service will depend upon many factors, including price levels, marketing strategies, and the pace at which demand for faster data connections grows, it is clear that this technology will extend the life of many copper cables well into the “digital age.” The same trends which are pushing down the cost of computers and modems will tend to make DSL technology more attractive, and extend the economic life of existing copper cables.

    To be sure, fiber offers important advantages over copper, and thus there will also be a trend towards increased use of fiber optic cable. Nevertheless, the rapid decline in the cost of electronic components, and rapid growth in the demand for fast Internet connections, video services, and other high-speed applications will also increase the demand for DSL (and successor technologies) which will extend the life of the of the installed base of copper cable.

    In evaluating this situation, it must be recognized that the trends are not entirely one-sided in favor of fiber and against copper. In fact, improvements in component miniaturization, advances in manufacturing techniques, increasing demand, and other factors that are contributing to the downward trend in fiber electronics costs will also serve to extend the economic life of copper cable. Copper cable will only become economically obsolete if demand for bandwidth outstrips the capabilities of copper based technologies, or if the electronics needed for a copper-based system were far costlier than the analogous electronics for a fiber-based system.

    At least during the next decade or two, there is no reason to anticipate that copper cable will be completely replaced by fiber optic cable. Nor is there any reason to believe that it will completely lose its economic value.


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    Senior Member Wingfoot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    Broadband Over Powerlines (BPL)


    Imagine plugging your computer into any electrical outlet in your home and having high-speed Internet access.


    An emerging technology may be the newest heavy hitter in the competitive world of broadband Internet service. It offers high-speed access to your home through the most unlikely path: a common electrical outlet.

    With broadband over power lines, or BPL, you can plug your computer into any electrical outlet in your home and instantly have access to high-speed Internet. By combining the technological principles of radio, wireless networking, and modems, developers have created a way to send data over power lines and into homes at speeds between 500 kilobits and 3 megabits per second (equivalent to DSL and cable).

    BPL is already being tested in several cities around the United States and the United Kingdom. In this article, HowStuffWorks takes a look at this new service, how it's possible, and what it could mean for the common electrical appliance.

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    Senior Member yahoo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    wowwwwwwwwwwwwww...I am impressed.....
    wise men talk because they have something to say and fools because they have to say something....plato

  11. #11
    Mke
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    Default Re: Old Communication lines

    here is the great thing about that. They are already implementing "power line communication" in some areas for remote monitoring of "smart" electrical meters. The are still limited by distance, but they get around this by having "repeater" stations in some of their substations to help improve the quality of the signals over the distances back to the office.

    What this technology has effectively done is create the chance for the utilities to bill people and companies for "peak" time usage. During the day or night you may still be billed at 5cents a Kw, but from 5 in the afternoon to 10 at night they would have the chance to bump up the fee for peak time billing. You could literately pay double or tripple for that time period and this technology will help them do it.

    They start now by pilot programs to help "Lower your energy usage". They will get you to sign up and get a free high efficiency water heater or heat pump on the agreement that they can monitor the electrical usage in your house. After a 6 month monitoring they compare their results to the new smart meters to comare data. If they feel they are realitively accurate.... boom.


    and yes the power company where I live is doing this. This is on the heels of them upping the rates 18%.

    mke

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